The Art of Learning
4/1/1999
Chris Griffin
The martial arts could be described, as Webster does, "as any of the several arts of combat and self-defense that are widely practiced as a sport." Once you're on the training floor, it becomes clear, through the depth and scope of the training, that the term "art" is truly warranted. Participants are constantly studying and experimenting with their movement. They develop, by necessity, a holistic approach to human movement - if that other hand or foot is forgotten, one's technique is clearly less effective and you may receive an unpleasant reminder.
Sections
Animals
Art of Living
Athletes
The Back
Babies & Children
Chronic Pain
The Classroom
Creativity
Flexibility
Healthy Aging
Introduction
Martial Arts
Neuroplasticity
Performers
Pilates
Posture & Balance
Recovery
The Shoulders
Stress
Vision
The Workplace
Walking
Yoga
About SenseAbility
SenseAbility is a monthly newsletter written by Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitionerscm and trainees to explore the various applications of the Method. We have well over 100 articles here to enrich and expand your understanding of the Feldenkrais Method®, Awareness through Movement® lessons, Functional Integration® lessons, and our founder, Moshe Feldenkrais.
Calling all Writers
If you are interested in writing for SenseAbility, please contact Carla at news@feldenkraisguild.com.
Tai Chi and the Feldenkrais Method
by: Ralph Strauch, Ph.D., G.C.F.P.

4/1/1999

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Tai Chi and the Feldenkrais Method both see natural human movement as involving the entire person in a smooth and flowing way, balanced without effort in the field of gravity, under a special kind of effortless control. Moshe Feldenkrais calls such movement "elegant," while the Chinese speak of a body "so light that a feather will be felt and so pliable that a fly cannot alight on it without setting it in motion."

To read entire article, click on title link above.
Applying the Feldenkrais Method in the Martial Arts
by: Charlie Velez

9/1/2005

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Today's martial artists are concerned about what can they do to be more flexible, and injury free. As a martial artist I can appreciate this first hand. After my training in 2001, I started to incorporate Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement lessons in my classes. Many students were hesitant because of the strategy of moving slower, as opposed to moving fast.

To read entire article, click on title link above.
Moving From Your Center In All Directions
by: Leslie Wilder, GCFP

9/1/2005

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I love to introduce the Feldenkrais Method into my teaching. My first Awareness Through Movement classes were, in fact, taught at the dojo where I have practiced Aikido for 24 years and have been teaching for 15 years. In the 13 years since I began my Feldenkrais training, I have observed that my personal practice has been clearly enhanced and my Aikido instruction has been enriched. I am 58 years old, and I know the Feldenkrais Method has allowed me to keep practicing Aikido in a very full manner. My technique continues to improve, my Ukemi (the ability to respond to the technique without harm) gets smoother. I continue to take break-falls and do Suwari Waza (knee-walking).