Movement & Emotions
9/6/2017
Buffy Owens, GCFP
Recently, a student approached me at the end of class and asked if experiencing strong emotions while doing Awareness Through Movement® lessons was normal. My answer: “Yes.” Emotions don’t surface all of the time, but it does happen and the intensity of the experience can vary.

When I first started reading Moshe Feldenkrais’ books nearly 20 years ago, I was completely obsessed with the mind-body connections—specifically how I could shift my emotional base and perspectives by working with my body. I consumed his writings along with those of Ida Rolf, Alexander Lowen, and books like EMOTIONAL ANATOMY.

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About SenseAbility
SenseAbility is a monthly newsletter written by Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitionerscm and trainees to explore the various applications of the Method. We have well over 100 articles here to enrich and expand your understanding of the Feldenkrais Method®, Awareness through Movement® lessons, Functional Integration® lessons, and our founder, Moshe Feldenkrais.
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If you are interested in writing for SenseAbility, please contact Carla at news@feldenkraisguild.com.
Anxiety, Chronic Stress and the Feldenkrais Method®
by: Victoria Worsley FG (UK)

9/6/2017

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While we think of anxiety and stress as mental or emotional states, it is important to remember that they are part of a very complex story that encompasses a cascade of physiological events throughout our whole selves. This story involves a delicate flux and balance held in the (autonomic) nervous system between arousal and relaxation, triggering changes throughout our systems (vascular, pulmonary, muscular, digestive, immune) that ideally enable us to meet periods of challenge effectively and, just as importantly, come back to a quieter, easier place when circumstances allow.

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What is Trauma?
by: Alfons Grabner, GCFP

9/6/2017

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Explore this ATM® lesson to learn about how you might be holding trauma in your body.

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The Art of Learning
by: Chris Griffin

4/1/1999

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The martial arts could be described, as Webster does, "as any of the several arts of combat and self-defense that are widely practiced as a sport." Once you're on the training floor, it becomes clear, through the depth and scope of the training, that the term "art" is truly warranted. Participants are constantly studying and experimenting with their movement. They develop, by necessity, a holistic approach to human movement - if that other hand or foot is forgotten, one's technique is clearly less effective and you may receive an unpleasant reminder.