On the Practice of Being Well
11/1/2017
Shannon Lynne Sullivan, GCFP
Happiness and Well-Being are practically synonymous in my culture of middle-class Americana. In fact, the definition of well-being according to Merriam-Webster is "the state of being happy, healthy, or prosperous.” Thus, by definition, happiness is a subset of well-being—one of three potential avenues. (Interestingly, the Oxford English Dictionary has a slightly, yet profoundly, different definition: "The state of being comfortable, healthy, or happy.” ) I believe it can be useful, functional, and freeing to challenge this definition.

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SenseAbility is a monthly newsletter written by Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitionerscm and trainees to explore the various applications of the Method. We have well over 100 articles here to enrich and expand your understanding of the Feldenkrais Method®, Awareness through Movement® lessons, Functional Integration® lessons, and our founder, Moshe Feldenkrais.
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Happiness and Wellbeing
by: Amona Buechler, GCFP

11/1/2017

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“Owing to the close proximity to the motor cortex of the brain structures dealing with thought and feeling, and the tendency of processes in the brain tissue to diffuse and spread to neighboring tissues, a drastic change in the motor cortex will have parallel effects on thinking and feeling.

A fundamental change in the motor basis within any single integration pattern will break up the cohesion of the whole and thereby leave thought and feeling without anchorage in the patterns of their established routines. In this condition, it is much easier to effect changes in thinking and feeling, for the muscular part, through which thinking and feeling reaches our awareness has changed and no longer expresses the pattern previously familiar to us. Habit has lost its chief support, that of the muscles, and has become more amenable to change.”
-Moshe Feldenkrais, Awareness Through Movement

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Musician's “Magic Zone”
by: Erin Finkelstein, GCFP

9/25/2017

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I was diagnosed with Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder while studying the clarinet during my sophomore year at the University of the Pacific, Conservatory of Music. I felt radiating pain whenever I played my instrument and feared that my future as a musician would be compromised. Wind instrumentalists, violinists, violists, and singers produce sound or hold their instrument by using their jaw and face. TMJ disorder is a common injury for musicians and can be debilitating for professionals.

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Freeing the Jaw
by: Buffy Owens, GCFP

9/25/2017

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The upper jaw, part of the cranium, connects most intimately with the spine and back of the body. Every movement the upper jaw makes reverberates through the spine. But we will explore that a bit more in another lesson.

The lower jaw (a.k.a. the mandible) connects most intimately with your body-core, rib basket, and sternum. Imagine this glorious network of soft tissue that connects the jaw to the clavicle (a.k.a. collar bones), sternum (a.k.a. breast bone), hyoid bone, the upper two ribs, and so much more.

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