Low Back Pain--It isn’t about Core Strength
4/4/2018
Dr. Tim Sobie, PT, Ph.D., GCFP
The statistics are daunting, if not downright depressing: 80% of adults experience low back pain at some point in their lives. The most common treatments include prescription medicines, chiropractic treatments, or physical therapy rehabilitation, typically with a focus on core stabilization. The theory behind core stabilization is that if you focus on strengthening your deep trunk muscles, you will be able to utilize your "core" more and put less strain on your back.

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SenseAbility is a monthly newsletter written by Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitionerscm and trainees to explore the various applications of the Method. We have well over 100 articles here to enrich and expand your understanding of the Feldenkrais Method®, Awareness through Movement® lessons, Functional Integration® lessons, and our founder, Moshe Feldenkrais.
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The Myth of the Core
by: Melinda Glenister

4/4/2018

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We are bombarded with messages that we need to protect our backs and strengthen our ‘cores’. There are so many misconceptions and assumptions made about ‘core stability’ which have seeped into our culture. However, more and more people are waking up to the limitations of the approach and realizing that the premise needs to be deeply questioned. Even the notion of what the ‘core’ is and if it actually exists is disputable.

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Core Strength vs Core Organization
by: Sandra Bradshaw, GCFP

4/5/2018

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Core Strength is Not your Master
by: Erin Ferguson, GCFP

4/4/2018

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Prevailing cultural ideas refer to the abdomen as the core, and we talk about "core strength" as being beneficial. Consider a few Feldenkrais®-based ideas about strengthening the abdomen:

Muscles must work in tandem
Let's talk about appropriate distribution of effort. If you can contract the abdominal muscles strongly, it doesn't mean you can use them efficiently.

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