NATAB Policy Development

NATAB Policy Development


Current policies:
New, Streamlined Trainer Candidate/Trainer Policy Approved Internationally
 
FGNA is pleased to announce that after many years of work, the international policies that guide the application and approval processes to become a Feldenkrais Trainer Candidate and Trainer have been streamlined and updated.

Policies for accrediting Feldenkrais training programs, and for approving or certifying Trainers, Trainer Candidates, and Assistant Trainers are developed and approved through an international process. There are currently four Feldenkrais training accreditation boards (TABs), and each TAB is responsible to a Governing Body.  The TABs work collaboratively to develop proposals for new policy or policy revisions.  These are then approved by their Governing Bodies. 
  
In 2013, the North American Training Accreditation Board (NATAB), an FGNA Board, initiated proposals to improve the process for approving Trainer Candidates and certifying Trainers. After several rounds of consultation, in 2015 the four TAB Governing Bodies approved a series of policy exceptions to help streamline the process until a fuller policy revision could be completed. 
 
In 2016, NATAB developed specific policy change proposals to further streamline the process and expand options for applicants, and to make these changes part of the international policies.  Suggestions from multiple rounds of feedback from the other three TABs and from the international Feldenkrais educational community were considered and incorporated.  The final proposed changes were unanimously approved internationally by the TAB Governing Bodies, effective October 10, 2019.
 
Here is a summary of the key changes that have been made:
  1. The number of days that someone who is an “experienced Assistant Trainer” (as defined in the policy) or a Trainer Candidate can teach in a training program without a Trainer present and with Trainer supervision, has been increased (see #12 in TAGs).
  2. The definition/criteria for “experienced Assistant Trainer” has been adjusted to reduce the experience requirements to qualify as an experienced Assistant Trainer (see #12 in TAGs).
  3. There is no longer a time limit for how long a person can be a Trainer Candidate.  A person can continue as a Trainer Candidate if they want – or they can move on to apply for Trainer certification.
  4. A Trainer Candidate applicant who wants to apply for Trainer can submit their Guidance Committee or Alternate Way proposal later, separately from the first part of their Trainer Candidate application.
  5. There is now a “fast-track” to Trainer Candidate and Trainer for HIGHLY experienced Assistant Trainers (as defined in the policy).
  6. The approval process has been changed a bit to include a reference to ethics, to adjust how the educational community feedback happens, and to specify how many TABs need to be involved.


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